Indigenous Peoples’ Week

**All events for Indigenous Peoples Week 2021 will be held via Zoom!

Indigenous Peoples’ Week Event Calendar 2021

Indigenous Peoples’ Week Event Calendar 2021

Indigenous Peoples’ Week: Monday, October 11, 2021 – Friday, October 15, 2021

 

Indigenous Peoples' Day is a day to celebrate the legacy of Native and Indigenous peoples and recognize the impact of colonialism on our communities. It is a day to celebrate our strength as contemporary Native peoples by uplifting our cultures, traditions, ways of life, and resilience.

We are still here.

Although historically this day was recognized as C*lumbus Day, many states have dropped celebrations of the colonizer and adopted Indigenous Peoples' Day instead. At UConn, NACP provides events and celebration all week long to pay homage and respect to our ancestors and our upbringings into our culture. As contemporary Natives we must continue to pave the way for those relatives who will come after us. Our ancestors are the ones who have empowered us to do so.

See below for more information about individual events and how to join us!

#IndigenousPeoplesWeek2021 #IndigenousAtUConn #ThisIsWhatIndigenousLooksLike #IndigenizeUConn

 

Monday, Oct 11– Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Monday, Oct 11– Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Monday, Oct 11–Land Grab CT Website Launch – 12pm landgrabct.org

Monday, Oct 11–Land Grab CT Website Launch – 12pm        landgrabct.org

 “INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY: Past, Present, and Future” 6pm via Zoom

ID: 944 0453 4797
Passcode: Nmz9F2
The Indigenous Peoples’ Day: Past, Present, and Future panel will discuss the history of Indigenous Peoples’ Day and the way the holiday was adopted at the University of Connecticut. This panel also aims to look at what the future may hold for Indigenous peoples at the university.

Tuesday, Oct 12th– “Indigenous at Connecticut Universities: Student Perspectives Panel”

Tuesday, Oct 12th– “Indigenous at Connecticut Universities: Student Perspectives Panel”
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Yale X QU X UConn, 6pm

ID: 972 9283 1066
Passcode: C29jdd
The Indigenous at Connecticut Universities: Student Perspectives Panel aims to discuss what it is like being Indigenous in higher education, specifically in the state of Connecticut. These panelists come from many different Indigenous affiliations, and they all are current students at either the University of Connecticut, Yale University, or Quinnipiac University.

Wednesday, Oct 13– Quinektikut Blanket Exercise

Wednesday, Oct 13– Quinektikut Blanket Exercise

Led by the Akomawt Educational Initiative, 4-6pm

ID: 970 9407 1929
Passcode: 3PBDis
The Blanket Exercise is an experiential learning activity that demonstrates land theft in North America. It highlights themes of dispossession, cultural genocide policies, and the overall effects of colonization. The exercise will be facilitated by the educational initiative Akomawt. This event is coordinated by UConn’s Native American Cultural Programs in collaboration with UConn Collaborative Organizing and Friday’s For Future.

Thursday, Oct 14– Keynote Address #LANDGRABU

Thursday, Oct 14– Keynote Address #LANDGRABU

Dr. Robert Lee and Tristan Ahtone- Authors of landgrabu.org, 4pm

ID: 933 8441 6299
Passcode:  7MaX2w
The NACP and NAISA will host Tristan Ahtone and Bobby Lee, creators of the Land Grab U project, as keynote speakers, which will be held virtually. The keynote event will address the wealth and land accumulation built through the dispossession of Indigenous people and how they are tied to the Land Grant university system through the Morrill Act of 1862. Rather than the common panel discussion with a standard question and answer pattern, the keynote will preempt the in-depth, participatory Encounters Series dialogue, which will take place on the following day.

Friday, Oct 15– ENCOUNTERS DIALOGUE

Friday, Oct 15– ENCOUNTERS DIALOGUE

Land Grab CT: A Dialogue on UConn’s Colonial History, 12-2pm

Attendance by registration only: click here to register!

 

The keynote event (Thursday 10/14) will address the wealth and land accumulation built through the dispossession of Indigenous people and how they are tied to the Land Grant university system through the Morrill Act of 1862. The dialogue event will be held virtually in conjunction with the Democracy and Dialogues initiative of Dodd Impact and the Human Rights Institute as a continuation of the conversation from the previous day. Both events are open to the UConn Community and the dialogue is capped at 40 participants.